Turkish Twitter war over education



Plans to abolish "prep schools" in Turkey have sparked a huge feud between two of the country's most powerful forces on the micro-blogging website Twitter.

Turkey's Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his AK party have proposed eliminating the schools, which provide private tuition classes to help high school children prepare for university entrance exams.

This has angered supporters of the Gulen movement, which finances and runs many of the schools. Numerous hashtags about the row have been tweeted millions of times over the past week.

Pakistan PM Praises Turkish Schools In Erdogan's Visit

Speaking at the Pakistan-Turkey Business Forum on Monday, Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif pointed out the historical alliance between the two countries and paid compliments to the PAK-TURK schools established by Turkish entrepreneurs.The Pakistan-Turkey Business Forum was held in Lahore, the capital. Speaking at the Pakistan-Turkey Business Forum on Monday, Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif pointed out the historical alliance between the two countries and paid compliments to the PAK-TURK schools established by Turkish entrepreneurs.

The Pakistan-Turkey Business Forum was held in Lahore, the capital of the Pakistani province of Punjab. The forum was attended by Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Pakistani Prime Minister Sharif. The main topic of the forum was trade relations between the two countries and future opportunities for both countries.

In his speech, Sharif stated that relations between two nations have been growing every day and the business forum has been another major step in these relations.

There is a great deal of potential in textile, energy, telecommunication, agriculture and transport in Pakistan and I would like to personally invite Turkish businesspeople to get a share of these investments,” he said.

During his speech, Sharif praised the PAK-TURK schools by saying: “The 23 PAK-TURK schools have played a great role in improving relations between the two countries in terms of cultural and emotional bonds. I want you to know that Pakistan always regards Turkey as a friend and an ally.”

PAK-TURK schools are known for their success among Pakistani people and have been mentioned in The New York Times, among other news sources, in previous years.

Source:  Haberler.com - 12/24/2013

‘Turkish schools in Africa important for strong relations'

The first-ever Rwandan ambassador to Turkey, Lt. Gen. Caesar Kayizari, has said that Turkish schools in Africa play an important role in strengthening relations between African nations and Turkey, adding that Turkey has a lot to offer Rwanda in terms of education.

Turkey's building of schools in Rwanda in particular, and in African countries in general, is of great importance. Education is significant for establishing strong relationships. Turkey for a long time was absent in Africa. Now that it has opened to the continent, education could be one of the tools that the Turkish government can use, as education builds the future,” Kayizari said.

The policy of opening up to the African continent, which was initiated in 2005, occupies a special place in Turkey's foreign policy. Turkey's Africa initiative, an expansion project to which the country has attached great importance in recent years, is moving full steam ahead.

Pak-Turk School donates Rs1m for victims of Philippines typhoon

Islamabad - Students of a Pak-Turk International Schools and Colleges have donated Rs1 million from their pocket money and savings for the children affected by the typhoon Haiyan that devastated Philippines recently.

Soon after the typhoon, administration of the school organised a fund raising campaign to help the deserving in the Philippines during which students from the pre-school to college contributed wholeheartedly.

Speaking at a ceremony organised at the completion of the drive, Pak-Turk Director Kamil Ture said that the step was taken as part of service and to meet critical humanitarian needs which is part of our education system. “We want to lift sense of responsibility among students and provide them an opportunity to serve humanity selflessly which will help transform them into noble citizens,” he added.


Davutoğlu says Turkish Schools abroad play an important representative role

Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoğlu has said Turkish schools abroad are playing an important representative role and that Turkish government officials will do everything to support them.

Davutoğlu’s remarks came after a series of statements by ruling Justice and Development Party (AK Party) officials supporting Turkish schools abroad.

As the Turkish government, it’s our duty to take care of our citizens’ problems or needs no matter what political views they have. Not depending on which community they belong to, these schools and non-governmental organizations have played an important role in countries such as Somalia and Myanmar; therefore we will support them if they ever need us.These schools are important institutions as they help spread the Turkish language and the Turkish culture abroad,” Davutoğlu told reporters on Tuesday.

He concluded his words by saying that the Turkish government will keep supporting their citizens in any case and people should be aware of this fact.

Turkish Schools Offer Pakistan a Gentler Vision of Islam

by SABRINA TAVERNISE, The New York Times

KARACHI, Pakistan — Praying in Pakistan has not been easy for Mesut Kacmaz, a Muslim teacher from Turkey.He tried the mosque near his house, but it had Israeli and Danish flags painted on the floor for people to step on. The mosque near where he works warned him never to return wearing a tie. Pakistanis everywhere assume he is not Muslim because he has no beard.

"Kill, fight, shoot," Mr. Kacmaz said. "This is a misinterpretation of Islam."

But that view is common in Pakistan, a frontier land for the future of Islam, where schools, nourished by Saudi and American money dating back to the 1980s, have spread Islamic radicalism through the poorest parts of society. With a literacy rate of just 50 percent and a public school system near collapse, the country is particularly vulnerable.